Eff yeah, octopodes!
tentacritters:

Pink octopus, species unknown

tentacritters:

Pink octopus, species unknown

anoceanactivist:

Mimic Octopus (by “Buzz”)

anoceanactivist:

Mimic Octopus (by “Buzz”)

sawsharks:

DUMBO!

Grimpoteuthis discoveryi, probably~

sawsharks:

DUMBO!

Grimpoteuthis discoveryi, probably~

fuck-yeah-cephalopods:

Octopus - Cala Galdana, Menorca - España by Zambeze72 on Flickr.
Octopus vulgaris.

Octopus vulgaris.

Depending on the species, octopodes may lay anywhere between 500 to 500,000 eggs. Females never leave their eggs from the time they are fertilized to the time they hatch. This usually takes around a month (again, this can vary a great deal depending on species (Enteroctopus dofleini brood their young for around six months)), during which the mother won’t even venture out to get food. Some octopodes have been known to eat their own arms for sustenance rather than leave their den and their eggs open to danger.
The mother will clean each of the eggs individually with her tentacles, and blow air currents over them to ensure that they get enough oxygen.
 After hatching, the larval octopodes will spend their time near the surface of the water -feeding on plankton and other small organisms until they are strong enough to survive on the ocean floor.

Depending on the species, octopodes may lay anywhere between 500 to 500,000 eggs. Females never leave their eggs from the time they are fertilized to the time they hatch. This usually takes around a month (again, this can vary a great deal depending on species (Enteroctopus dofleini brood their young for around six months)), during which the mother won’t even venture out to get food. Some octopodes have been known to eat their own arms for sustenance rather than leave their den and their eggs open to danger.

The mother will clean each of the eggs individually with her tentacles, and blow air currents over them to ensure that they get enough oxygen.

 After hatching, the larval octopodes will spend their time near the surface of the water -feeding on plankton and other small organisms until they are strong enough to survive on the ocean floor.

Octopus kaurna, or Southern Sand Octopus.As their common name would indicate, they spend most of their time buried under the sand, and venture out into the open at night to look for food.

Octopus kaurna, or Southern Sand Octopus.

As their common name would indicate, they spend most of their time buried under the sand, and venture out into the open at night to look for food.